Behavioral Disorders

Behavioral Disorders

Conduct disorders are a set of ongoing emotional and behavioral problems that occurs in children and teens. A young person with these types of behavioral disorders may display a pattern of disruptive and violent actions and have problems following rules. The young person's pattern may involve defiant or impulsive behavior, drug use, or criminal activity.

Another behavioral disorder, called oppositional defiant disorder, may be a precursor of conduct disorder. A child is diagnosed with oppositional defiant disorder when he or she shows signs of being hostile and defiant for at least 6 months. Oppositional defiant disorder may start as early as the preschool years, while conduct disorder generally appears when children are older. Oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder are not co-occurring conditions. That means they don't happen at the same time.

Causes

  • Behavioral Disorders has been linked to:
  • Family neglect or child abuse
  • Drug or alcohol abuse in the parents
  • Marital problems or family conflicts
  • Genetic defects
  • Separation from family
  • Poverty, large family or crowding

The diagnosis is more common among boys. It is also more common in cities. It is hard to know how common the disorder is. This is because many of the qualities for diagnosis, such as "defiance" and "rule breaking," are hard to define. For a diagnosis of conduct disorder, the behavior must be much more extreme than is socially acceptable. Conduct disorder is often linked to attention-deficit disorder. Conduct disorder also can be an early sign of depression or bipolar disorder.

behavioral disorder

When untreated ... a behavioral disorder can easily lead to drug addiction and alcoholism

Symptoms

Children with conduct disorder tend to be impulsive, hard to control, and not concerned about the feelings of other people.

Symptoms may include:

  • Breaking rules without clear reason
  • Cruel or aggressive behavior toward people or animals (for example: bullying, fighting, using dangerous weapons, forcing sexual activity, and stealing)
  • Not going to school (truancy -- beginning before age 13)
  • Heavy drinking and/or heavy drug abuse
  • Intentionally setting fires
  • Lying to get a favor or avoid things they have to do
  • Running away
  • Vandalizing or destroying property
  • These children often make no effort to hide their aggressive behaviors. They may have a hard time making real friends.

Exams and Tests

There is no real test for diagnosing conduct disorder. The diagnosis is made when a child or adolescent has a history of conduct disorder behaviors.

A physical examination and blood tests can help rule out medical conditions that are similar to conduct disorder. In rare cases, a brain scan helps rule out other disorders.

Treatment

For treatment to be successful, it must be started early. The child's family also needs to be involved. Parents can learn techniques to help manage their child's problem behavior.

In cases of abuse, the child may need to be removed from the family and placed in a less chaotic home. Treatment with medicines or talk therapy may be used for depression and attention-deficit disorder. Many "behavioral modification" schools, "wilderness programs," and "boot camps" are sold to parents as solutions for conduct disorder. Research does suggest that treating children at home, along with their families, is more effective.

Solutions

Children who are diagnosed and treated early usually overcome their behavioral problems. Children who have severe or frequent symptoms and who are not able to complete treatment tend to have the poorest outlook.

Possible Complications

Children with conduct disorder may go on to develop personality disorders as adults, particularly antisocial personality disorder. As their behaviors worsen, these individuals may also develop problems with drug abuse and the law.

Depression and bipolar disorder may develop in the teen years and early adulthood. Suicide and violence toward others are also possible complications.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

  • Regularly gets in trouble
  • Has mood swings
  • Is bullying others or cruel to animals
  • Is being victimized
  • Seems to be overly aggressive
  • Early treatment may help.

Prevention

The sooner the treatment for conduct disorder is started, the more likely the child will learn adaptive behaviors and avoid potential complications.

If your child or loved one, suffers from Conduct Disorder, call us now.

 

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